Pinay nannies in Korea, boon or bane?

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38 Responses

  1. arvinsign says:

    “The problem is recruiters have been turning her down since she isn’t a native speaker”

    – I can understand why this is happening. If we put ourselves in the shoes of these Koreans, most of us will probably do the same. If for example you want to learn “Standard Mandarin” as a second language, would you rather learn it from a Burmese who can speak Chinese (Sino-Tibetan) and not from a Han Chinese who lives in Beijing? Native speakers have something that majority of us dont have, and that is the ACCENT (not the mention the racial bias). And that is what they want and what they need. They dont care about learning grammar that much and the likes, because the sad fact is, many of them are more proficient than the average Filipino in as far as technicalities are concerned. (And besides i dont expect them to learn too much technicalities such as grammar from these native speakers since many of these NSETs are mediocre and were not English majors) Just give them the time (Koreans), and i will not be surprised if later on, we will be left behind again in this field. Are all Filipinos fluent in English? Of course not. However most of us think the other way (a fusion of nationalism and optimism). The TOEFL score ranking of the Philippines is something we need to worry, considering that probably all who took that TOEFL exams were actually college graduates (Nurses, Allied Medical Professionals etc.) and we had this language for over a hundred years already. Now we have the edge against Koreans, but the future is uncertain. My point is instead of hating the system for treating us second rates, lets just do something to improve our skills and image to be more competitive in this field.

    “”A painful truth that I have learned as a Filipina expat is that foreigners (i.e, non-Filipinos including Koreans and Westerners) usually prejudge us as “3D workers”, “mail-order brides” or “juicy girls”.””

    – This has something to do with numbers. Stigma is a result of social statistics. On the average, if i will think of 100 Filipinos i know who are staying in Korea right now, maybe 50% 3D workers, 40 % Korean spouses (including mail order brides, and true love stories), the rest other jobs/biz than the previous 2.

    “”if there’s one thing I’d like us to be known for in this country, it certainly isn’t as “English-speaking nannies.”

    – Same here. But what can we do, that stigma can be felt worldwide. We are not known as a country of Professionals, but rather as a country of 3D job workers. Its our stupid economy, and partly i want to blame the mentality and culture too. However its changing and improving in a positive way.

    • Betchay says:

      @arvinsign
      – I can understand why this is happening. If we put ourselves in the shoes of these Koreans, most of us will probably do the same.
      –> this is exactly what i said when i was interviewed on a radio program before… (In the said woman’s case though she’d been applying to schools that are specifically looking for native speakers, i.e. passport holders of the seven countries in Kachru’s inner circle. It isn’t that difficult to find a job at a private language institute even if you’re a Filipino.)

      @wendy
      – re our licensed professionals working as nannies outside the philippines… well, they all made the choice. must we always blame the government for the things we don’t have?
      –> did they really have a choice? i bet our teachers would choose to stay with their families and work in the philippines in their chosen fields if they are paid well enough to support their loved ones… korea used to send workers abroad too, their president that time though vowed to bring them back home whereas we have a president whose vision of empowering our citizens is to send super maids to other countries

      -so, if our fellow pinays here in korea would easily think of fellow pinays as nannies, should we feel bad about being pre-judged as nannies by other nationalities?
      –> i’m a super ‘deadma’ person that i earned the nickname ‘bato’ when i was in college… what i mean is as an individual i’m not personally affected but i should not always think of only myself… anyway the one time my friend anna and i were asked if we were 3d workers by fellow pinoys, we laughed and said yes!

      – the filipino nannies are highly-regarded
      –> yup, that’s why they are “cheaper to hire”

      @eden –> Equal opportunity is something that we really don’t have here.

      • koreanviv says:

        mm. sounds interesting… maybe if you are too high not to roll your sleeves and wait your profession and high standards you can eat and sit? Do you think so, other countries doing blue collar jobs are paid more than that of a clerk.. with pointed polish nails and just making coffee for their boss. If you really live in a certain country seeing what is the real life.. you and I can come to realize and say to ourselves… I think I’m much better than them being. Just think of the future.. don’t wait what your country can do for you.. but what you can do for your country! You are still a hero

  2. wendy says:

    hi betchay, remember i told you 2 or 3 stories about me being mistaken as the nanny of my son?… and the question came from fellow pinays. LOL. and i hardly go out of the house without make-up on… and i may not be a fashionista but what i wear matters a lot to me even when i just go out to the laundry shop or throw the garbage. so to be asked that question? huh! i was taken aback. but when i told my husband about it, we laughed it off.

    so, if our fellow pinays here in korea would easily think of fellow pinays as nannies, should we feel bad about being pre-judged as nannies by other nationalities? my first reaction when i read the article yesterday was at least, the filipino nannies are highly-regarded. wherever and whatever you do naman, being respected for it speaks a lot already, di ba? and countless filipinos work as nannies all over the world. it’s a reality.

    re our licensed professionals working as nannies outside the philippines… well, they all made the choice. must we always blame the government for the things we don’t have? many licensed doctors in the philippines chose to work as nurses in the US and europe for more money. should we blame the government for that, too? practical decisions for practical reasons. to each his own:-)

    wendys last blog post..Friday Frustrations: Television as a Nanny?

  3. eden says:

    Hmmm…

    —-“usually prejudge us as “3D workers”, “mail-order brides” or “juicy girls”—–I just don’t understand why our Asian neighbors don’t see that good part of us.

    Quite far from what we’ve been experiencing here. If you’re a Filipino, they would think you work in the medical field or, at least one of your family members work in the hospital. Something that people somehow look up to and something that we are respected for.

    edens last blog post..A Time off and un”HOLY” Hours

  4. wendy says:

    hey betchay – kitakits before you leave, ha.

    the government has always been an easy scapegoat for some of our failures. while many things may be thrown against our government (no matter whose administration it is under), it remains that individually we are in control of our own fate… and our own decisions. i had an interesting conversation about this with a friend back in UP in college. i just don’t believe in throwing the blame (of our personal decisios and misfortunes) to the government. we know that Korea achieved a strong economy because of their collective effort. should all the other (third world) countries in Asia emulate Korea? fact is, each country has its own political dynamics…

    “cheaper to hire” – i pay my filipina helper 65,000-won for an 8-hour work while my korean friends pay their korean ajummas 50,000-60,000-won. it’s even cheaper if they hire an ajumma through a government program. and the gist of the article is the language value of the filipino nanny. is recognizing their (the filipino nannies) value really so bad to our ego?

    wendys last blog post..Friday Frustrations: Television as a Nanny?

    • Betchay says:

      yup, each country has its own political dynamics and i didn’t mean that each country in all other third world countries should emulate korea… i mean what i said, there’s no other meaning to it

      as for blaming the government… i’ve met too many people who would like to stay with their families (and not be in deeper debt by borrowing thousands of money from loansharks to pay their recruiters) and work at home but there are either no jobs available for them or no jobs that would pay enough to support their families… some people have choices, others don’t and i don’t think the government is entirely blameless…

    • drsnowmon says:

      Paying 65,000 won is alot considering how clerks or those that works at construction site gets paid in Korea

  5. puh says:

    arvinsign i kinda agree with you with the reason why korea only hires native speakers..but on the hind sight, there are pinoys who have ACCENT & can teach as good or maybe better than those native speakers..trust me, i know what im talking about..but stil we cant do anything..its their govt choice..your also right that many filipinos are not really proficient in english..but those who i know who are proficient are really way of the charts in their command of the english language (speech & written)..theyre really, really good!..yup, maybe one day they can surpass us in english proficiency (koreans), but you would agree that even our lower class people in our country can comprehend english..this is even without formal studies of the english language. actually even our local terrorists can speak english (ex: npa leaders or abu sayaf)..and dont worry about toefl or toeic scores..from what i know, those test are good, but they dont really determine a persons english fluency..i can show you a korean who has a very high english score but would have a hard time working in an american call center..at the same time, i can show you a top call center agent who will flunk any of those english tests..whats my point? its not the score thats important but its how you use it..english is a language not a subject..finally, theres no way we can go around from how we are perceived but we just really need to raise our level & be competitive..which i guess is also your point also..

  6. Melissa says:

    Hi. I’ve been reading (and haved linked to) your blog for a while now and I find it very interesting. I’m pretty sure I’ve commented before too.

    I find this topic/thread very interesting but I have a couple of things I wanted to ask about.

    First, this: “Han In-kyung, manager at Family Care, a job placement agency, added that aside from the language benefits, non-Korean workers are cheaper to hire”. And I wanted to ask – are they? Really? I’ve had three or four part-time and full-time helpers over the past few years and none of them have been “cheaper” than Korean ajummas. I’m a native Engllish speaker (from Canada) and my kid’s father is Korean so my helper’s native language is not a big issue for me – but I’ve been hiring Filipina women because they seem to be more ‘in tune’ with my own parenting style and generally more communicative. But cheaper? No way.

    The second thing I want to ask is about Wendy’s comment. She said “LOL. and i hardly go out of the house without make-up on… and i may not be a fashionista but what i wear matters a lot to me even when i just go out to the laundry shop or throw the garbage…” and I didn’t understand that. Do you mean that wearing make-up means you can not be/usually are not hired help or a nanny? I had no idea! My two previous helpers have been stunningly beautiful women who consistently maintained tasteful makeup and fashion while also tending wonderfully to my daughter and helping with the laundry. Weird. I must have hired in a fashion anamoly!

    Anyway. I love your blog, and sorry for the long comments!

    Cheers!~

    Melissas last blog post..Seoul CD Exchange

  7. Lizzie D. says:

    Lol..typical Filipino trait – we hate to be associated with the lower class, so wearing nice clothes and make-up supposedly make us ‘higher’ than them. How can we blame foreigners for generalizing us when all they see is statistics? Stigma begins with us, and that is what we have to do something about.

  8. wendy says:

    Ooooppppssss… i have touched some sensitive nerves here.

    Hi Melissa, my part-time Filipino helper now is very young and pretty. Our Korean visitor yesterday who has stayed for some time in the Philippines remarked that she looks like one of the celebrities in the Philippines. Just like what I said in my second comment, I agree with you that Filipino nannies are not cheaper compared with Korean ajummas. I can only speak from experience and I can say that every won is worth it. Same as with my previous helpers, the current one even volunteer to extend beyond our agreed time just to finish her work.

    Hi Lizzie – and what’s a typical Filipino trait?… and it’s only from you that i know that wearing nice clothes and make-up can be so divisive as it can define who belongs to the “higher class” and the “lower class”.

    if read carefully (sans the typical emotional outbursts) my comments above never intended to discriminate. On the contrary I am questioning: what’s wrong with being a nanny when there is dignity in the work? for the rest of the Filipinos who are not nannies, is it too much to the ego to recognize the value and high-regard being given to Filipino nannies here in South Korea?

    wendys last blog post..Friday Frustrations: Television as a Nanny?

    • Betchay says:

      hi wendy! since we somehow know each other, i’d like to comment a bit on the “ego” part… i didn’t say that there’s no dignity in being a nanny. my mother used to work as a nanny at the young age of 13, long story but anyway… i’m not sure if you read everything in my post but i don’t see anything egoistic about wishing that our people could have better jobs, rather than being nannies to koreans… unlike you and other professionals here, we will be staying here for a long time (our choice)… i don’t have a nanny but i tried getting a filipina because i thought i’d be helping my kababayan even if i’d benefit more from a korean (since i want my son and i to have more exposure with the language)… to koreans who would be reading the article (its equivalent in korean), it doesn’t really matter whether you’re paying your helper more than what you’d pay a korean… they already have that idea that filipina nannies are “cheaper to hire”… i’ve known several filipinos here who’ve been hired because to koreans they’re “cheaper”… last month alone, there is an ad on worknplay looking for a filipino office receptionist to work full-day for 600K a month… one of our blogger friends worked for 1.2M a month as a teacher/secretary… three months ago, i received an email from a korean looking for a filipina teacher… and she was going to pay her 1.05M for a full 12 hour work, when i told her that that’s really low she said that because they’re filipinos (i didn’t bother to post that “ad”)… i know of other stories such as this… it’s not a matter of ego for me to wish for something better for me or for others…

      • koreanviv says:

        Just dropping by,, Now, qualified Filipino Teachers are receiving 2.0+M in other regions of Korea. Before (2006), I received 1.5M a full time teacher from (9:30-5:00). 1.2 are for undergraduates and for some starters … If you want to verify come and join our organization… FEESK site: http://www.beta2009.multiply.com or check the feesk go at the facebook site and you can see what’s happening.. updates and more. Let us water the seed and it will grow. Filipinos are number 22 most hospitable people in the world. I still salute you who roll their sleeves and not wait what their country can do for them.

  9. eden says:

    ‘Bout wearing nice clothes and make-up going out so as not to be associated with “lower class”——

    I don’t think being associated or being classified as a higher or lower class isn’t the real reason. It’s being decent and somehow gain respect. Sad but it’s true that there are people who actually judge you by how you look. I have a friend, she used to be an English instructor in Taiwan before she has decided to take up nursing. She told me that she had to dress up and wear make-up not to look good but to look outstanding. She had to do it every single day because that’s what she was required to do aside from being asked to pretend like she’s actually from the US. She used to live in Chicago but it has actually been hard for her to do what she was asked to.

    edens last blog post..A Time off and un”HOLY” Hours

    • Betchay says:

      hi eden! my MIL told me that appearance is important here because that’s how you respect the people you meet… she told me that after i commented that even the street vendors in korea dress nicely… it’s true for some although i think that for more people, it’s really their vanity… and i’m not condoning them (since i’m also an imelda marcos in training… shoes!)

      • koreanviv says:

        ah yes, you are right.. more presentable when you meet accidentally high standard people and want have pics with you. Even janitors here, come and we go check it. Let’s take the subway. Too see is to believe

    • XOXOGossipGirl says:

      Eden, wearing make up and nice clothes are part of being a professional.

      I am an English teacher in the Phil. and in Korea. I put simple make up and nice clothings. We, teachers, should look professional and presentable. I have so many experience being with the kids, mind you, they love pretty teachers.

      I’m sure your friend didn’t put make up and wear nice clothes just because she was ordered to do so. In fact, she clearly knew that it is a prerequisite. (+_+)

  10. Teresita says:

    Ako po ay nagtapos ng Engineering. Interesado po ako na maging yaya diyan sa Korea. Maaari niyo po ba ishare kung paano magapply. 3 taon na po akong namamasukan sa isang maliit na kumpanya at nakakahiya man sabihin ngunit di po kaya ng sweldo kong 385/day buhayin ang pamilya ko. Maraming salamat.

    • Betchay says:

      hi Teresita! Minimum wage ba yan? Hindi pa rin tumataas? I-try mo na lang Singapore, pwede ka pa mag-work dun as engineer.

    • XOXOGossipGirl says:

      You deserve to have a better job. Try to get a more deserving option for you. Like what Ms. Betchay said. You’ll just be payed less than you expect here.

    • batista says:

      ok lang yan teresita konting tyaga lang, while working you should also apply for other jobs local/abroad, why nanny!!! there`s a lot of opportunities, your problem is you are tied to your company and thinking about your security your daily necessities while neglecting what is more important. umabsent ka once or twice in a month and make worth of your absent that you apply for any possible high paying job. find your destiny, look for a better picture and apply what you’ve learn.

  11. algol says:

    maybe one of the reasons why nannies are expensive in Korea is that the market is not open

    in HK, the monthly minimum wage for DHs is around 3700 HKD (approx 600K KRW) (living in)

    the Korean government should open the market

    • Betchay says:

      may idea na nga ang korean government to import Filipino english teachers eh… let’s just wait for that (although mas kailangan natin ang teachers)…

  12. algol says:

    boon or bane?

    from whose perspective?
    the Filipino professionals in Korea?

    Kahit naman walang Filipina DHs sa Korea, mababa naman talagang tingin ng mga Koreano sa atin.

    I think that I’ve already related this before; I had to deal with some 공무원s at the civil aviation office and at KARI. The ones at the civil aviation office told me “You’re Filipino? Is your status legal?” (nya hahaha! when I told my Korean colleagues, they told me that I should have shot back with 아 시발!).

    The ones at KARI looked down their noses at me. During our first meeting, I heard the team leader say “I thought he was a foreigner! (read: Western foreigner)” (and that was because I was using English during our phone conversations before the meeting)

    so I say, let the DHs come.

  13. arvinsign says:

    @ puh

    “there are pinoys who have ACCENT & can teach as good or maybe better than those native speakers..”

    – I agree 100 pct. But the problem is on what proportion? And i think people with skills like this are less likely to choose ESL teaching as a Profession. Im not sure

    “”but you would agree that even our lower class people in our country can comprehend english..this is even without formal studies of the english language. actually even our local terrorists can speak english (ex: npa leaders or abu sayaf)..”

    – yeah i agree. Its cool i guess hehe, imagine even the Abu Sayaf hehe. But like what ive said, the language was with us already for over a century. Americans first came to the Philippines way back 1899. And as you may know already, English was first introduced to us via the Thomasites around 1901. So im no longer surprised as to why Filipinos can do well in English communication.

    “dont worry about toefl or toeic scores..from what i know, those test are good, but they dont really determine a persons english fluency..i can show you a korean who has a very high english score but would have a hard time working in an american call center”

    – I know. But i would rather have a good TOEFL score, but less in oral communication skills. For the latter can be amplified with just extra confidence and exposure, as long as you have the technical know how already (theoretical). But a failure in theories is i guess more difficult to correct. But you are right i agree, that English is a language not a subject.

    “”finally, theres no way we can go around from how we are perceived but we just really need to raise our level & be competitive””

    — Yes of course. We have a long way to go, but we can do it.

    @ wendy

    I agree that we should stop blaming the government for what we are now, and as to why many Filipinos chose to work abroad. What we are as a country is because of how we think and act in general. Most of us are nationalistic only in words, but not in action.

    • puh says:

      hey, thanks for not being hard on my comments..hehe..just wanted to make a small point here..this in relation to toeic or toefl tests..koreans when they study english they want so much to learn correct grammar..i mean the technical stuff..but still until now, they have the lowest score on intl english test..english comprehension is way beyond just grammar..actaully if you realize, the english language has evolved..slang, idioms, metaphors & new words coming out on websters..theres actually a story of a french guy who studied english for 10yrs & was really good at it..then he was invited to come over to the U.S by his american friend..one time his american friend brought him to a movie house..when they were about to enter the movie house, his american buddy was greeted by someone with the words “whats up?”..the french guy was so puzzled because he thought the guy who greeted them meant “whats up” literally..so what he did was he looked up in the ceiling..oh no!..haha..im not against having grammar as a foundation but most american kids can speak english but would flunk grammar classes..

  14. Marites says:

    It would be really hard to change the world’s perception on the Filipinos if we ourselves keep reaching for standards below than what we are qualified to do. The change should start with us, educating ourselves more and getting more globally competitive. We do not even need our govt to do it for us but we can do it individually for ourselves.

    Maritess last blog post..Music Monday#3 Seasons of Love from Rent

  15. Doogie says:

    There’s much work to be done to see changes here in the Philippines. But I believe that it starts with us. Do great things with our own lives and we hope that it will inspire other Filipinos to do great themselves. And then who knows a great leader will come and spark that sense of nationalism in us. That I think we don’t have. Sheer love for this country. Well yeah and a great leader too. Let’s accept it, we badly need one.

    Regarding the Filipino nannies? I don’t think there’s anything ghastly about it. People make choices to survive. There’s so much dignity to working hard. Whether these Nannies are degree holders or not, its still hard work. If we are perceived only as such, then let’s change that perception.

  16. arvinsign says:

    @ Betchay

    “but i don’t see anything egoistic about wishing that our people could have better jobs, rather than being nannies to koreans”

    – Im thinking of the same thing. I agree 100pct. I guess all Filipinos should stop the crap of talking about the dignity of working as a nanny or any 3D job either as a personal choice or for whatever reason. That is not the issue. We are not in an election, and no one will win votes even if anyone is standing up voicing out their praises for these hard working pinoys. It is a universally accepted fact already that these jobs are moral and dignified, dont put yourselves in an echo chamber.

    But reality check, how much respect does this people get? Are we contented with this, for anyway we can say at least they have a decent job? Don’t we want our people to have better jobs, with better salary (so they can serve their families better) and can gain lots of RESPECT? What is the purpose of education anyway? Are we always contented with mediocrity?

    We’ve been a country of slaves and laborers for the past 500 years. Is it not time to move on? at least for our children, and our children’s children etc?

    What is the difference between us and the Japanese, Koreans, Caucasians? Why they are progressive while most of us are suffering? Its because of how they think and how they live their lives, their choices and their objectives/goals. We are a country full of unambitious, easily satisfied beings.

  17. lizzie says:

    people can be funny^^…everyone is entitled to his/her own opinion right?…can there be a country of doctors only? or engineers?..or nurses?…or jobs considered to be “respected and highly-valued?”…i wish there were but none that we can think of…we have our own concept of “respected jobs”…but how is a nurse being different from a caregiver?..the money?…length of study?the color of their scrub suits?^^…they do the same and it can be viewed as a 3-d job as well…coz both of them face (and wipe) the same secretions and excretions, dont they?a flight attendant isnt far from that range, is it?…and a doctor isnt oblivious to the smell of a diabetic foot that needs dressing…but you say, he is clad in his white gown and a stethoscope hanging down his neck ‘all the time’…how different is an engineer from any construction/factory worker?^^…and how is a teacher turned into a nanny different from a stay at home mom who graduated with honors in her class??..how about filipinas married to koreans who graduated with a bachelor’s degree and even are licensed but eventually became english teachers (by circumstance and/or demand)- how are they SO different from other filipino professionals working as nannies??…isn’t this wasted knowledge also?^^yup, there is no harm being ambitious and collect all the alphabets (CPA,MD FPS,DDM,PhD..etc..etc)before and after our names for all we care but can’t we think that not all are called to be doctors..or engineers..or businessmen..or lawyers…the philippines is an agricultural country but nobody doesnt want to till the land and be called a poor, uneducated farmer….or maybe you will be a respected farmer if you are a graduate of UPLB^^….oh well, we want to hear people say that we are “down to earth” despite our stature in life but we dont really want to bow down to the earth^^….most of the time we love to ‘carry our chair and stack it high up to the heavens’….maybe we are a country of unambitious and self-satisfied people but boy! we are all braggarts…this is very evident especially to those filipinos who are working/living abroad or married to other nationalities….(very quick to tell that ive been to this and that country…and my husband has this and that kind of job)…we really want to hit the star only to find out that a stone would land right on our face…im sure someone will comment that i view this issue in a different (and twisted) perspective^^ hahahaha…ask yourself first, what do you DO and how different are you??^^…

    • puh says:

      “yup, there is no harm being ambitious and collect all the alphabets (CPA,MD FPS,DDM,PhD..etc..etc)before and after our names for all we care..”

      -this is straight up funny..lol

      “oh well, we want to hear people say that we are “down to earth” despite our stature in life but we dont really want to bow down to the earth^^….most of the time we love to ‘carry our chair and stack it high up to the heavens’….maybe we are a country of unambitious and self-satisfied people but boy! we are all braggarts…”

      -in a way, im guilty of this..

      hey, your perspective is cool..reality bites!

  18. arvinsign says:

    “the Philippines is an agricultural country but nobody doesnt want to till the land and be called a poor, uneducated farmer”

    – i thought the farmers are the ones that are wealthy? or am i wrong? Maybe its a case to case basis.

    “i wish there were but none that we can think of…we have our own concept of “respected jobs”…but how is a nurse being different from a caregiver?..the money?…length of study?the color of their scrub suits?^^…they do the same and it can be viewed as a 3-d job as well…coz both of them face (and wipe) the same secretions and excretions, dont they?”

    — Well the only people who can answer this are the nurses themselves as well as the caregivers, or the engineers and the construction workers (or any other comparisons of professions). In every institution , there is hierarchy, and respect from others depends on whether you are at the top or at the bottom of that hierarchy. The rule is, if you know better, you deserve better. That is a fair rule.

    – There is a socially accepted definition for 3D jobs, which was based on the Japanese expression 3K: kitanai, kiken, and kitsui. Look it up

  19. Randy says:

    Betchay said “each country has its own political dynamics”, and I’d like to add that each country and even city has its own stereotypes too.

    Being from the southern US, I agree with Eden that Filipino women are usually highly regarded and the stereotype is often that they’re nurses or work in hospitals. I’ve never been to South Korea, but have seen that in Hong Kong Filipino women are seen more as domestic workers or nannies.

    Statistics probably do play a part, and people migrate to different countries for different reasons. …better not to stereotype an entire people in general!

  20. Sankoi says:

    Yes, we really can’t blame anything to anyone but having those foreigners think of us as “dirty” and “low” people is a disheartening fact. Anyway, we can’t force them to like us or respect us but we’ll just have to show what we’re made of. Gahi ta brad! Walay mubigay sa’to a. Taas-noo nating harapin lahat.hehe

    Remember what Precious Lara Quigaman said? That was really a punchline.

  21. bradley says:

    We are currently looking for a top class, friendly Live in Aupair,Househelper,chef,Driver to work for a really nice family in central London

    Descriptions of the job:
    Location: Central London 9 Perth St, Edinburgh, Midlothian EH3 5DP, United Kingdom
    Children: 2 children: boy 5y , Girl 3y
    Requirements: someone friendly, smiley, sporty, intelligent, both children are well educated and smart and therefore they would prefer to have a nanny who is also switched on, someone easy to get along with, reliable and mainly trustworthy, confident driver
    Hours: Monday to Friday from 7:30am -5:30pm
    Salary: £500 per week net.
    Accommodation: nice separate studio flat with own bathroom and kitchenette, separate entrance too,with 24 hours internet connection.
    Feeding:free
    Tax:free

    How to apply for this job?

    You can reply to this ad or send us an email with your CV, references and a clear photo of yourself to :
    bradleykyle84@yahoo.com
    bradleykyle84@gmail.com
    bradleykyle84@hotmail.com

    We are looking forward to hearing form you 🙂

    Bradley kyle family

  22. Williams & Williams says:

    For international job placement. Contact: tinaparecruitment@yahoo.com

  23. catlaine says:

    Hi Ms Betchay,

    I’m looking for housekeeping job or babysitting but it depends on the baby’s age 🙂 let me know if there are some vacancies 🙂 Thanks a lot .

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